November 29, 1864

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Telegram Sent on: November 29, 1864.
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Transcript

Recd 445pm Executive Mansion

Washington, Nov. 29, 1864

No.34 W

Governor of Iowa. Des Moines 242


May I renew my request for the

exact aggregate vote of your state cast at the last

election? My object fails if I do not receive

it before Congress meets.

A.Lincoln

30fnd(?)

Michigan 241 No. 35 W Lansing Mich

D Wisconsin 242 ,,36,, Madison Wis

D Missouri 242/255 ,,37,, Jefferson City

D Ohio 241 ,, 38,, Columbus O

D Oregon ,,39,, Salem Oregon

K Penn, 248 ,,8 P Harrisburg Pa

$ Kansas 242 ,,40 W Ft. Leavenworth Kan

$ West. Virginia ,,41,, 241 Wharling(?) Va


Historical analysis

This analysis makes use of a heuristic for historical thinking know as SCIM-C developed by David Hicks, Peter Doolittle and Tom Ewing. For more about this historical thinking heuristic please see http://www.historicalinquiry.com

Summary of telegram

President Abraham Lincoln wrote a telegram from the Executive Mansion to the Governor of Iowa, William Stone, on November 29, 1864. In this telegram, President Lincoln is requesting the exact number of votes that were cast in the last Iowa election. President Lincoln is also informing governors those numbers are critical for his address to Congress.

Context of the telegram

This telegram was written by President Abraham Lincoln as a follow-up to the message that was sent on 15 November 1864 to Governor Stone and several other state governors. Governor Stone was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1864 and gave the nominating speech for Andrew Johnson as Vice President. Data supplied from state governors who positively responded to President Lincoln's first request for vote tallies were instrumental in helping the president tabulate votes during the election. President Lincoln required an exact vote number count to include in his annual address to Congress on 6 December 1864.

[1]

Inferences from the telegram

President Abraham Lincoln made it clear, in a polite and professional manner, this was not his first request for an exact vote tabulation. President Lincoln required concrete voting data as a point of reference for many important topics during his annual speech to Congress on 6 December 1864. It seems he would use these numbers as validation and to also garner additional support for his vision of what American would look like in the future.

Notes

  1. This is a reference