Telegrams for students at Midway High School

From Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Below is the text for all five of the telegram memos feature in the February 29, 2012 activity.


You can access all the information about these telgram by clicking on "Main page" on the left and then navigating your way to the date.



April 20, 1864

Officer in Military Command at Fort Warren Boston Harbor, Mass

If there is a man by the name of Charles Carpenter under sentence of death for desertion at Ft. Warren, suspend execution until further order, and send the regard of his trial. If sentences for any other offenses, telegraph what it is, and when he is to be executed. Answer at all events.

A.Lincoln


(Analysis of the telegram can be found here)



June 13, 1864

Major General Thomas

Louisville, Ky


Complaint is made to me that in the vicinity of Henderson, our military are seizing negroes and carrying them off without their own consent and according to no rules whatever, except those of absolute violence. I wish you would look into this & inform me, and see that the making soldiers of negroes is done according to the rules you are acting upon, so that unnecessary provocation and irritation be avoided.


A. Lincoln


(Analysis of the telegram can be found here)



July 18, 1864 (2)

Major General Sherman

Chattahoochee River, GA


I have seen your dispatch objecting to agents of Northern States opening recruiting stations near your camps. An act of Congress authorizing this, giving the appointment of agents to this States and not to the Executive government. It is not for the War Department, or myself, to retrain or modify this law, in its execution, further than actual necessity may require. To be candid, I was for the passage of the law, not apprehending at the time that it would produce such inconvenience to the armies in the field, as you now cause me to fear. Many of the States were very anxious for it, and I hoped that, with their State bounties, and active exertions, they would get out substantial additions to our colored forces, which, unlike white recruits, help us where they come from, as well as where they go to. I still hope advantage from the law; and being a law, it must be treated as such by all of us. We here, will do what we consistently can to save you from difficulties arising out of it. May I ask therefore that you will give your hearty co-operation?


A. Lincoln


(Analysis of the telegram can be found here)



November 6, 1864 (1)

Hon. W.H. Seward,


Nothing of much importance. Day before yesterday rebels destroyed two of our wooden grain boats at Johnsonville, on Tennessee River. Curtis, on the 4th, was at Fayetteville, Ark. still running and damaging [---]. Richmond papers say Yankees landed at Escambia Bay below Hilton (not far from Mobile) capturing fifty men, destroying all camps, [---], wagons, salt-works, and everything in and about Hilton. Richmond papers also confirm the destruction of the Albemarle and the consequent evacuation of Plymouth, N.C.


A. Lincoln


(Analysis of the telegram can be found here)



November 21, 1864

Hon. A.R. Wright

Louisville, Ky


Admitting that your cotton was destroyed by the Federal Army, I do not suppose any-thing could be done for you now. Congress has appropriated no money for that class of claims, and will not, I expect, while the active war lasts.


A. Lincoln


(Analysis of the telegram can be found here)